Aurelia Probiotic Skincare Miracle Skin Cleanser Review

Last year, I stopped using bi-phase makeup removers and foaming cleansers after I found they were too harsh on my skin, making my breakouts worse. I first shifted to thick balm cleansers, such as Emma Hardie and Eve Lom, but both proved too much for my will-breakout-if-you-look-in-my-general-direction skin. That was when I discovered Aurelia Probiotic Miracle Cleanser.
Aurelia Probiotic is a 100% cruelty-free, botanical British skincare brand. They have some lovely oils and creams, but this cleanser is their cult product.

Scroll down for the review of Aurelia Probiotic Miracle Skin Cleanser.

Aurelia Probiotic Skincare Miracle Skin Cleanser Review

As is typical for a balm cleanser, this comes in a jar packaging. The supersized version comes in a pump-bottle. I use a spatula to get the product out.
It comes with a very fine anti-bacterial muslin cloth. I prefer flannel cloths for cleansing, but I suppose this cloth would do at a pinch, if you are travelling.
Aurelia Probiotic Miracle Skin Cleanser does not contain synthetic fragrances, colourants, parabens, mineral oils, silicones, sulphates, propylene glycol, phthalates, GMO, PEGs, TEA, DEA, MI, formaldehyde, urea,  mercury, lead, or bee venom.
Aurelia Probiotic Skincare Miracle Skin Cleanser Review

Ingredients for this cleanser include extracts of eucalyptus, bergamot, rosemary, hibiscus, ubuntu mongongo oil, chamomile and cocoa butter. So where does the "probiotic" part come in? In the form of three key ingredients - Lactose (Probiotic Bifidoculture Milk Extract), Lactis Proteinum/Milk Protein (Probiotic Protein), and Bifida Ferment Lysate (Probiotic Culture). These probiotic glycoproteins repair damaged tissue, prevent free-radical damage, and strengthen the skin's moisture barrier, and reveal glowing, fresh skin. 
Aurelia Probiotic Skincare Miracle Skin Cleanser Review

Texture-wise, this is a smooth cream with body butter consistency. Think non-greasy mayonnaise. No grit, grease or goo. Fragrance is incredibly mild but pleasant. I apply it straight on my dry, fully made-up face, without any water. I use a pea-sized amount, and the cleanser glides on the skin beautifully. I dot it all over the face and massage it in for a bit - both against the grain and along the grain - until my makeup has formed a peculiar blancmange all over the face.
I then add water, which turns the whole thing into a liquid consistency. A few more circular motions later, I wipe the lot off with the cloth, and end up with soft, cleansed but not dehydrated skin.
Makeup removal is effective and complete with this. What about waterproof mascara, you ask? For that, I first have a go with Bioderma or a botanical-based, mild micellar water such as Caudalie's, and then follow with this cleanser. That sends all the warpaint packing.

Verdict and where to buy Aurelia Probiotic Miracle Skin Cleanser

If you want to break away from two-phase makeup removers and get going with a one-stop, incredibly gentle cleanser than removes all makeup thoroughly at one go, then this is your answer. If you are looking to begin with oil or balm cleansers, but worry about acne, then look no further than Aurelia Probiotic Miracle Skin Cleanser. Or, if you just want a super-gentle, botanical cleanser that does not strip the skin, this is the one.
The cloth helps with gentle exfoliation. I do, however, wish that they would supply a proper flannel cloth, like Emma Hardie or Trilogy does. Given the price, this isn't too much to ask.
Aurelia Probiotic Miracle Skin Cleanser costs $49 for 120ml and $80 for the 240ml supersized version. That sounds like a lot, but you only need a pea-sized amount, so a jar will last for four months or more. Buy the 120ml jar here, and the supersized bottle here. Both ship worldwide. 

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